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Partners with Jesus

7 Jun

Dwell much upon this partnership with the Son of God, unto which you have been called: for all your hope lies there. You can never be poor while Jesus is rich, since you are in one firm with him. Want can never assail you, since you are joint-proprietor with him who is possessor of heaven and earth. You can never fail; for though one of the partners in the firm is as poor as a church mouse, and in himself an utter bankrupt, who could not pay even a small amount of his heavy debts, yet the other partner is inconceivably, inexhaustibly rich. In such partnership you are raised above the depression of the times, the changes of the future, and the shock of the end of all things. The Lord has called you into the fellowship of His Son Jesus Christ, and by that act and deed He has put you into the place of infallible safeguard.

SpurgeonCharles Spurgeon (1834-1892)

All of Grace, Trinity Press, 2011, 118.

 

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A Curious Idea

20 May

Spurgeon_repentance

Faith and Apples

12 Apr

What the child’s hand is to the apple, that your faith is to the perfect salvation of Christ. The child’s hand does not make the apple, nor improve the apple, nor deserve the apple; it only takes; and faith is chosen by God to be the receiver of salvation, because it does not pretend to create salvation, nor to help in it, but is content humbly to receive it.

SpurgeonCharles Spurgeon (1834-1892)

All of Grace, Trinity Press, 2011, 55-56.

Grace, Free Grace!

27 Mar

We are accustomed not only to say “grace,” but “free grace.” It has been remarked that this is a tautology. So it is, but it is a blessed one, for it makes the meaning doubly clear and leaves no room for mistake. Since it is evidently objectionable to those who dislike the doctrine intended, it is manifestly forcible, and therefore we will keep to it. We feel no compunction in ringing such a silver bell twice over — grace, free grace.

CH Spurgeon

Sermon No. 1524, p122

Smote With His Own Sword

22 Feb

I have heard another say, “I am tormented with horrible thoughts. Wherever I go, blasphemies steal in upon me. Frequently at my work a dreadful suggestion forces itself upon me, and even on my bed I am startled from my sleep by whispers of the evil one. I cannot get away from this horrible temptation.” Friend, I know what you mean, for I have myself been hunted by this wolf. A man might as well hope to fight a swarm of flies with a sword as to master his own thoughts when they are set on by the devil… Remember Martin Luther’s way of cutting the devil’s head off with his own sword. “Oh,” said the devil to Martin Luther, “you are a sinner.” “Yes,” said he, “Christ died to save sinners.” Thus he smote him with his own sword. Hide you in this refuge and keep there; “In due time Christ died for the ungodly.” If you stand to the truth, your blasphemous thoughts which you have not the strength to drive away will go away of themselves; for Satan will see that he is answering no purpose by plaguing you with them… The poor diseased or woman could not come to Jesus for the press, and you are in much the same condition, because of their rush and throng of these dreadful thoughts. Still, she put forth your finger, and touched the fringe of the Lord’s garment, and she was healed. Do you the same.

Charles Spurgeon (1834-1892)

All of Grace, Trinity Press, 2011, 67-9.

Unreasonable Repentance

15 Feb

I hear another man cry, “Oh, sir my want of strength lies mainly in this, that I cannot repent sufficiently!” A curious idea men have of what repentance is! Many fancy that so many tears are to be shed, and so many groans are to be heaved, and so much despair is to be endured. Whence comes this unreasonable notion? Unbelief and despair are sins, and therefore I do not see how they can be constituent elements of acceptable repentance; yet there are many who regard them as necessary parts of true Christian experience. They are in great error… To repent is to change your mind about sin, and Christ, and all the great things of God.

Charles Spurgeon (1834-1892)

All of Grace, Trinity Press, 2011, 65-6.

Slender Faith Threads

25 Jan

See then, dear friend, that the weakness of your faith will not destroy you. A trembling hand may receive a golden gift. The Lord’s salvation can come to us though we have only faith as a grain of mustard seed. The power lies in the grace of God, and not in our faith. Great messages can be sent along slender wires, and the peace-giving witness of the Holy Spirit can reach the hearts by means of a thread-like faith which seems almost unable to sustain its own weight. Think more of him to whom you look than of the look itself. You must look away even from your own looking, and see nothing but Jesus, and the grace of God revealed in Him.

Charles Spurgeon (1834-1892)

All of Grace, Trinity Press, 2011, 39.

Faith is the Chain

7 Jan

Faith is the work of God’s grace in us… Grace is the fountain and the stream; faith is the aqueduct along which the flood of mercy flows down to refresh the thirsty Sons of men… Never make a Christ out of your faith, nor think of it as if it were the independent source of your salvation. Our life is found in “looking unto Jesus,” not in looking to our own faith. By faith all things become possible to us; yet the power is not in the faith, but in that God upon whom the faith relies. Grace is the powerful engine, and faith is the chain by which the carriage of the soul is attached to the great motive power.

Charles Spurgeon (1834-1892)

All of Grace, Trinity Press, 2011, 37-8.

Fountain of Promises

12 Dec

Man’s promises, even at the best, are like a cistern which holds but a temporary supply; but God’s promises are as a fountain, never emptied, ever overflowing, so that you may draw from them the whole of that which they apparently contain, and they shall be still as full as ever.

CH Spurgeon

The Grace Abyss

10 Dec

What an abyss is the grace of God! Who can measure its breath? Who can fathom its depth? Like all the rest of the divine attributes, it is infinite. God is full of love, for “God is love.” God is full of goodness; the very name “God” is short for “good.” Unbounded goodness and love enter into the very essence of the Godhead. It is because “his mercy endureth for ever” that men are not destroyed; because “his compassions fail not” that sinners are brought to him and forgiven.

Charles Spurgeon (1834-1892)

All of Grace, Trinity Press, 2011, 37.

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